Sweet Land of Liberty Part 5

Right now I’m in California and the temperature could get up to 74° today.  When I left Saint Paul yesterday morning it was -12°!  During my down time today, and before the lecture tonight, I am alternating computer work with walking laps around the parking lot of the hotel were I am staying. I just can’t pass up taking advantage of this great weather!

Now for the borders on the Sweet Land of Liberty quilt.  I utilized my planned leftover half square triangles in this pieced border.  I sewed them together, changing direction in the center of each border.

Pieced Border Strips

Many times when adding a pieced border, I rely on an inner border to make my pieced border fit my quilt; not this time. With this pieced border I am going to adjust the pieced border in the center by inserting coping strips or taking a larger seam.

This is a close up of the center portion of the pieced border, with the half square triangles changing direction, and before the adjustments were made.

Center before coping piece

After measuring my quilt top and my pieced borders I discovered that I needed to add a couple of inches to the top and bottom borders to make them fit the quilt top.  So I just ripped out the center seam and inserted this coping strip.

Top and bottom with coping piece

The side borders were just 1/2″  to long to fit the quilt, so I simply took in the center seam. Yes I chose a different treatment for the side borders than I did for the top and bottom borders, I love making up my own rules!

Sides with center tuck

And here is the quilt top with borders added! It’s pinned onto my design wall sideways.

Top with Borders added

On my list of things to do when I get home is to load this on the longarm and get it quilted!

Of course this quilt is a great use of 5″ squares!

Enjoy!
Pat

Pat Speth author of:  Nickel Quilts,   More Nickel Quilts,    Amazing Nickel Quilts,  Nickel Quilts & Borders, and The Big Book of Nickel Quilts

This information is copyright protected
© 2014 Pat Speth
All rights reserved.
This pattern/design is for your personal, non-commercial use only.
You are not allowed to mass produce this information.

Email: pat@patspeth.com
www.patspeth.com

Sweet Land of Liberty Part 4

It’s time to show you the progress I have been making on the Sweet Land of Liberty quilt.  The blocks have all been sewn into rows and all the rows are sewn together!  This is the quilt top so far pinned sideways on two of my design walls. I’m loving it!  There are about 90 different blues and over 100 different reds.

Sweet Land of Liberty quilt top before borders

For the pressing when sewing the sashing blocks to the cornerstones, I decided to press away from the sashing and towards the cornerstones. This is the wrong side of a sashing row section showing the pressing.

pressing of sashing B

I’m also pressing away from the sashing and towards the blocks when sewing together the block rows.  This is the wrong side of a block row section showing the pressing.

pressing of sashing

I do love this quilt and the sashing I chose for it, which of course starts me thinking about other main blocks I could use with the same sashing treatment.  For a simpler and faster block you could just select some wonderful large scale fabric and add the connecting corners in the same manner so you still have those planned leftover half square triangles. Layer cakes (those 10″ squares) would be a great choice for these blocks since you could trim away just 1/2″ for the needed size of 9 1/2″.

alt block idea

Of course this quilt is a great use of 5″ squares!

Enjoy!
Pat

Pat Speth author of:  Nickel Quilts,   More Nickel Quilts,    Amazing Nickel Quilts,  Nickel Quilts & Borders, and The Big Book of Nickel Quilts

This information is copyright protected
© 2014 Pat Speth
All rights reserved.
This pattern/design is for your personal, non-commercial use only.
You are not allowed to mass produce this information.
Email: pat@patspeth.com
www.patspeth.com

Sweet Land of Liberty Part 3

Below are my hourglass units all ready to be sewn into the sashing blocks for the Sweet Land of Liberty quilt.

plates of hourglass units

The main block is going to measure 9″ (finished size), so I am adding spacer strips to my hourglass units to make my sashing block finish the same size in length as my main block.  The spacer strip is cut 2 1/2″ x 4″.

2 HG and spacer

Sew two hourglass units to a spacer strip and press towards the rectangle. The sashing block should measure 4″ x 9 1/2″ at this point (unfinished).

pieced sashing

More assembly information on this quilt will follow in another post.

Enjoy!
Pat

Pat Speth author of:  Nickel Quilts,    More Nickel Quilts,    Amazing Nickel Quilts,  and  Nickel Quilts & Borders

Email: pat@patspeth.com              www.patspeth.com

This information is copyright protected
© 2013 Pat Speth
All rights reserved.
This pattern/design is for your personal, non-commercial use only.
You are not allowed to mass produce this information.

Sweet Land of Liberty Part 2

This quilt is coming along nicely and I love it when the quilt looks just as good as I imagined it would.  This picture shows half of the blocks up on the design wall with the pieced sashing blocks.  Red cornerstones still need to be selected and added before everything is sewn together.

on design wall

I’m working with prints and plaids in the blocks and I went to my stash of already cut 5″ squares and selected an assortment of prints.

Blue prints

Then I went to my stash of already cut plaids and picked out some wonderful ones.  The plaids are all from upcycled shirts!

Plaids

To make the block you need:

four 4″ squares of background (light) fabric

four 5″ squares of blue, I used two plaids and two prints

squares for snowball blocks

Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of the background square.  With right sides together stitch one thread width to the outside of the diagonal line (towards the corner you are going to cut away). I am making planned leftovers; the bonus half square triangles will be used in the pieced border that I am adding to this quilt.  Stitch a second seam a scant 1/2″ away from the first.

Connecting corner for two units

Cut on the diagonal line.

Units cut on diagonal

Set the seams and press the seam on the larger unit towards the light and the seam on the half square triangles to the dark. Set aside the half square triangle units for the pieced border.

two units

Arrange four different units as shown below and sew together.

arrange units for block

More assembly information on this quilt will follow in another post.

Enjoy!
Pat

Pat Speth author of:  Nickel Quilts,    More Nickel Quilts,    Amazing Nickel Quilts,  and  Nickel Quilts & Borders

This information is copyright protected
© 2013 Pat Speth
All rights reserved.
This pattern/design is for your personal, non-commercial use only.
You are not allowed to mass produce this information.

Email: pat@patspeth.com
www.patspeth.com

Sweet Land of Liberty and Hourglass Units

During the past two months I’ve been gone from home teaching almost nonstop and have not done much with the charity quilts I’m making.  Four Square is ready to be loaded on the longarm and quilted, but it’s going to have to wait a couple more weeks.  I’m packing for a week long retreat, non teaching- I get to quilt!  I have started on my third charity quilt and am taking it with me to work on.  Below is the EQ6 drawing of the quilt, I’m naming it Sweet Land of Liberty and it will go to Quilts of Valor.

Sweet Land of Liberty EQ6 image

To make Sweet Land of Liberty I am making lots of hourglass units.

4 hourglass units

To make hourglass units from 5″ squares, select one dark and one light square.

1 dark 1 light

1. Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of a 5″ square of background (light) fabric. With right sides together, place the marked background square on top of a square of the main fabric

Line on background

2. Stitch a “scant” 1/4″ wide seam on both sides of the diagonal line.  I always sew my seams using a “scant” 1/4″ wide seam allowance. This is a slightly narrower seam, about a needle-width narrower than the full 1/4″. This narrower seam allows for the thickness of the thread in the seam allowance, the pressing of the fabric over the seam, and results in a more accurately sized unit.  Give it a try!

Stitch on each side

3. Cut on the diagonal line to yield two half-square-triangle units.

Cut on diagonal

4. Press to set the stitching; then press the seam toward the dark fabric.

press to dark

5. Select two different half square triangles and draw a diagonal line on the back of one of them that is perpendicular to the seam line.  Do not trim these units up!

two different hst

6. With right sides together and with light and dark fabrics opposite each other, center the marked unit on top of the other unit. Nestle the center seam and pin in place. Sew on both sides of the diagonal line.

dark against light

7. Cut on the diagonal line. Press to set the stitching; then press the seam to one side in each unit.

Stitch and cut

8. You are ready to trim!  The easiest way trim this unit is with a 4″ square ruler. Simply lay the ruler on the unit with the corners of the ruler lying right on top of the seams.  Trim all four edges.

square up 4 inch ruler

To make four hourglass units that have two different dark fabrics in them like the units shown below simply start with two background squares and two different dark squares and follow steps 1 through 8.

2 dark 2 light4 hourglass units

Enjoy!

Pat

Pat Speth author of:   Nickel Quilts,    More Nickel Quilts,    Amazing Nickel Quilts,  and  Nickel Quilts & Borders

This information is copyright protected
© 2013 Pat Speth
All rights reserved.
This pattern/design is for your personal, non-commercial use only.
You are not allowed to mass produce this information

Email: pat@patspeth.com
www.patspeth.com

Four Square Setting Audition

I’m still on the road teaching and in the hotel rooms I have some time to catch up on writing about the quilts I am making. When I’m at home and the choice is: do I work on the computer or do I quilt, guess which one usually wins?

This is my setting audition of Four Square.

Whenever I audition blocks in a setting for a quilt I always start with the blocks just block-to-block and row-to-row.  This would be a good setting for these blocks if you wanted to do some custom quilting in the large plain spaces where four blocks come together.

block to block

However, I am longarm challenged and don’t like my quilting to be the focus on any quilt I make so I’m going to try adding sashing.  I do like the way this looks with the scrappy sashing between the blocks. And the great thing about scrappy sashing is you don’t have to worry about running out of the fabric you’re using!

Scrappy Sashing

But I just have to try these with one sashing fabric.  I really enjoyed the speed of the quilt assembly on the Turnabout quilt with one sashing fabric.  I glanced around my studio and my eyes landed on a piece of vintage gold/mustard yellow. Looked like enough yardage in this piece for what I needed so I gave it a try.

Gold Sashing

I love it! It is so bright and cheerful and makes me happy just looking at it.  I’ll save the scrappy sashing for another quilt someday.

Now it’s time to assemble this quilt!

Pat

Turnabout Quilt Assembly Part 2

Taking advantage of the fact that I am using the same fabric for all the sashing pieces and inner border, I decided to piece together sections of the sashing fabric and cornerstone fabric. I will then cut it into strips; fast and efficient!

If making the quilt yourself, here is the information you need:

From the sashing fabric cut 2 pieces that measure 13″ x 12″

And 6 pieces that measure 7 1/2″ x 12″

From the cornerstone fabric cut 5 pieces that measure 1 1/2″ x 12″

Sew the pieces together with the 13″ x 12″ pieces on the outside.

Sections for sashing rows

Cut this pieced section into 7 segments that are 1 1/2″ wide. In the picture below I have folded the pieced section into thirds before cutting.

Strip cut sections for sashing

Now, sew these sashing rows between each of the block rows.

Sections pieced together with sashing rows

Add a 2″ wide inner border piece to the top and bottom pieced border rows.

Inner border added to top and bottom pieced borders

Sew the pieced border rows onto the top and bottom of the quilt and your quilt top is done!

Top is done

I love this quilt! And what’s really fun to realize is that most of the fabrics in this quilt are ten to twenty years old! This quilt makes great use of those fabrics and I know many quilters have stashes like mine that span a few decades!  I’m giving this to charity and I also think it would be a good charity quilt project for quilt guilds and individuals.  This quilt measures 58 1/2″ x 74 1/2″, and because of how it is constructed if you want to make it in a different size it’s very easy to do.

Now it’s time to load this on the machine and get it quilted!

To find all the blog posts relating to the Turnabout quilt, simply type “Turnabout” in the search box that is located on the black bar near the top right of each blog page. 

If you belong to a quilt guild let your program chairperson know it’s time for a Nickel Quilt workshop where I teach many fun quilts and techniques!

Pat

Turnabout Quilt Assembly

I’m assembling the Turnabout quilt in rows including the pieced border.  I’ve started referring to this method of assembly as “Carefree Borders.”

I used one fabric for the sashing, inner border and binding. If doing the same you will need  2 1/4 yards of fabric.

For the block rows I simply added a 1 1/2″ x 7 1/2″ sashing piece between each block.

Sashing sewn to block

I immediately put the block rows back up on the design wall to admire the view!

Blocks rows sashed

Now I audition the placement of the border blocks.

Placement of the pieced border blocks

Next I sew the side border blocks onto the rows using an inner border piece that measures 2″ x 7 1/2″.

Border Blocks added to rows

For the top and bottom border assembly I used sashing pieces between the border blocks that measure 1 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ and inner border pieces that measure 2″ x 4 1/2″ to join the corner units to the rows.

DSCN2093

The corner units are simply a 4 1/2″ squares with a 2 1/4″ connecting-corner added.

Corner unit

Next I will prepare the sashing rows.

If you think this quilt and its pieced borders are fun your guild would love my Fabulous Nickel Borders lecture!

Pat

Turnabout Quilt Sashing Audition

All the blocks are done for my Turnabout quilt!  Now it’s time to go to the design wall and play with the layout of the quilt.  First, I’m setting the blocks just block-to-block and row-to-row.  Before I even do that with these blocks I have a pretty good idea that this is not going to be the best option, but you never know so I always give it a try.

Block to block

Now, I could love this quilt but I think sashing might make it even better; so let’s give a light sashing a chance.

Light Sashing

This sashing was maybe a little too busy with the dots of color in the fabric but I think the light value itself does not add anything to these blocks. So, next I audition black sashing.

Black sashing

I like the way the black sets off the blocks and this might be my choice but I just have to see what a plaid sashing might do.

Plaid

Interesting, not for these blocks right now but I will have to try the plaid sashing again on another quilt.

So the winner this time around is the black sashing.  Next I’m going to play around with some pieced border ideas for this quilt.

Pat

Baby Quilts Part 3

I’m back at home after being on the road teaching for the last three out of four weeks.  My laptop is not working so I’ve been unable to use it while away from home.  It’s been a strange start for my year as far as electronics go- first my DVD player quit working, just when I want to watch a few movies while staying tucked in my house on these winter evenings. Then my camera refused to turn on (sent it off for repairs), third  my external hard drive stopped working, and lastly it was my laptop.  I’m a little afraid to touch my longarm!

Now to catch up on the baby quilts.  To avoid complete chaos with all the plaids in the quilt, I’m going to divide and conquer by surrounding the blocks with denim sashing.  The denim is dress weight or shirt weight denim.  The strips are cut 2″ wide and rather than measuring the exact length for the block (8 1/2″) I’m just sewing pieces on and will trim later.

Block with side sashing

Sashing on two sides

Trimming after both sides have been added.

Side sashing trimmed

Then adding top and bottom sashing in the same manner as the sides.

Top and bottom sashing added

For these quilts I’m going to set the blocks in columns separated by additional pieced sashing.  They are going to be three block columns wide so the blocks at the top of the columns will have denim sashing around the entire block.

Three top blocks

The remainder of the blocks only need sashing on the sides and bottom.  I’m making fifteen of these blocks for one quilt.

Blocks with 3 sides sashed

Here are the columns arranged on the design wall and ready to sew together.

Blocks in columns

Next it’s on to the sashing that will separate the columns of blocks.

Pat