Sweet Land of Liberty Part 5

Right now I’m in California and the temperature could get up to 74° today.  When I left Saint Paul yesterday morning it was -12°!  During my down time today, and before the lecture tonight, I am alternating computer work with walking laps around the parking lot of the hotel were I am staying. I just can’t pass up taking advantage of this great weather!

Now for the borders on the Sweet Land of Liberty quilt.  I utilized my planned leftover half square triangles in this pieced border.  I sewed them together, changing direction in the center of each border.

Pieced Border Strips

Many times when adding a pieced border, I rely on an inner border to make my pieced border fit my quilt; not this time. With this pieced border I am going to adjust the pieced border in the center by inserting coping strips or taking a larger seam.

This is a close up of the center portion of the pieced border, with the half square triangles changing direction, and before the adjustments were made.

Center before coping piece

After measuring my quilt top and my pieced borders I discovered that I needed to add a couple of inches to the top and bottom borders to make them fit the quilt top.  So I just ripped out the center seam and inserted this coping strip.

Top and bottom with coping piece

The side borders were just 1/2″  to long to fit the quilt, so I simply took in the center seam. Yes I chose a different treatment for the side borders than I did for the top and bottom borders, I love making up my own rules!

Sides with center tuck

And here is the quilt top with borders added! It’s pinned onto my design wall sideways.

Top with Borders added

On my list of things to do when I get home is to load this on the longarm and get it quilted!

Of course this quilt is a great use of 5″ squares!

Enjoy!
Pat

Pat Speth author of:  Nickel Quilts,   More Nickel Quilts,    Amazing Nickel Quilts,  Nickel Quilts & Borders, and The Big Book of Nickel Quilts

This information is copyright protected
© 2014 Pat Speth
All rights reserved.
This pattern/design is for your personal, non-commercial use only.
You are not allowed to mass produce this information.

Email: pat@patspeth.com
www.patspeth.com

Sweet Land of Liberty Part 4

It’s time to show you the progress I have been making on the Sweet Land of Liberty quilt.  The blocks have all been sewn into rows and all the rows are sewn together!  This is the quilt top so far pinned sideways on two of my design walls. I’m loving it!  There are about 90 different blues and over 100 different reds.

Sweet Land of Liberty quilt top before borders

For the pressing when sewing the sashing blocks to the cornerstones, I decided to press away from the sashing and towards the cornerstones. This is the wrong side of a sashing row section showing the pressing.

pressing of sashing B

I’m also pressing away from the sashing and towards the blocks when sewing together the block rows.  This is the wrong side of a block row section showing the pressing.

pressing of sashing

I do love this quilt and the sashing I chose for it, which of course starts me thinking about other main blocks I could use with the same sashing treatment.  For a simpler and faster block you could just select some wonderful large scale fabric and add the connecting corners in the same manner so you still have those planned leftover half square triangles. Layer cakes (those 10″ squares) would be a great choice for these blocks since you could trim away just 1/2″ for the needed size of 9 1/2″.

alt block idea

Of course this quilt is a great use of 5″ squares!

Enjoy!
Pat

Pat Speth author of:  Nickel Quilts,   More Nickel Quilts,    Amazing Nickel Quilts,  Nickel Quilts & Borders, and The Big Book of Nickel Quilts

This information is copyright protected
© 2014 Pat Speth
All rights reserved.
This pattern/design is for your personal, non-commercial use only.
You are not allowed to mass produce this information.
Email: pat@patspeth.com
www.patspeth.com

Deli Geese Project – Block #4 – Shirley

Here is block #4 of the Deli Geese Block Project!

Shirley

4 Shirley

Yes, it has occurred to me that there will be some people reading this blog post who have no idea who Laverne and Shirley are, but luckily the majority of my blog and Facebook followers are in my same age group!  For those to young to know, Laverne and Shirley was a hit sitcom from 1976 through 1983 featuring two single gals sharing an apartment and working in a brewery in Milwaukee, WI.   For those who would like a trip down memory lane this YouTube link is the opening theme song.

Block #4 Shirley uses the Bottom Units from Light Flying Geese Units.  Details of making those units are found here.

Bottom Unit from Light Flying Geese

Bottom Light Unit

Shirley uses:

A – four Bottom Units from Light Flying Geese units

B – one 4 1/2″ square background (light) fabric

C – four 2 1/2″ squares background

D – eight 2 1/2″ squares, I cut these from 2 different 5″ squares

E – four 2 1/4″ squares background

4 Shirley

This block will measure 12″ at this point and finish 11 1/2″

This block as well as many others in the Deli Geese Block Project uses 5″ squares.  It’s a great block for charm packs, layer cakes, and of course stash fabrics.

Deli Geese, because they’re sliced!

Enjoy!
Pat

Pat Speth author of:   Nickel Quilts,    More Nickel Quilts,    Amazing Nickel Quilts,  and  Nickel Quilts & Borders

This information is copyright protected

© 2013 Pat Speth
All rights reserved.
This pattern/design is for your personal, non-commercial use only.
You are not allowed to mass produce this information.

Email: pat@patspeth.com

www.patspeth.com

Large Flying Geese Alternate Construction Method

The large Flying Geese used in my Deli Geese Block Project can also be made from larger squares and therefore do not have a center seam. Great layer cake idea! And when using just one background fabric for the larger triangle in a light bodied Flying Geese unit, it can be faster and more efficient.

To make large light-bodied Flying Geese this is what you need:

One  9 1/4″ square of background (light) fabric – this is going to turn into the larger triangle in the unit

Four  4 7/8″ squares – yes these can be cut from 5″ squares!

squares needed

1. Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of the 4 7/8″ squares.

diagonal line

2. With right sides together, place two of the 4 7/8″ squares on top of the 9 1/4″ square in opposite corners. Sew a “scant” 1/4″ seam on each side of the diagonal line.

Stitch on each side of diagonal line

3. Cut on the diagonal line.

cut on diagonal

4.  Set the seam and press towards the smaller triangles.

Press

5. Sew the remaining 4 7/8″ squares onto the large triangle portions of the units.

add remaining squares

6. Cut on the diagonal line. Set the seams and press towards the smaller triangles.

cut

7. This method will yield four large Flying Geese units per set of squares that will measure 4 1/2″ x 8 1/2″ at this point (unfinished).

four flying geese units

I’ll be using this method a lot in my Deli Geese Block Project since I am still able to utilize all those 5″ squares I’m so fond of!

Enjoy!

Pat

Pat Speth author of:  Nickel Quilts,    More Nickel Quilts,    Amazing Nickel Quilts,  and  Nickel Quilts & Borders

This information is copyright protected

© 2013 Pat Speth
All rights reserved.
This pattern/design is for your personal, non-commercial use only.
You are not allowed to mass produce this information.

Email: pat@patspeth.com

www.patspeth.com

Fat Quarter Cutting Diagrams

For those of you that have many fat quarters in your life and are having fun making Nickel Quilts this is how I cut up my fat quarters to make the best use of them. You are able to get twelve 5″ squares from every fat quarter and a 2 1/2″ strip.

And for those of you who might have projects in mind that use more 2 1/2″ strips you can certainly cut more strips than 5″ squares – my feelings won’t be hurt!

Don’t forget those layer cake (10″ square) ideas – yes you can do that also.  What a great use of fat quarters; 10″ squares, 5″ squares and 2 1/2″ strips in many combinations- I am showing just one below.

So tackle that stash – but don’t feel like you have to take it on all at once.  You will be amazed at how fast your 5″ square collection can grow by just cutting a few fat quarters everyday.  This is something you can even do after working all day, whether it’s outside the home at a job or at home taking care of your family. Trust me I know what it’s like trying to juggle a job, family, and a house.  Take time for yourself and your creative hobby even if it’s just 15 minutes a day, you deserve it!

Pat