Silver Lining and Alternate Block #2

Presenting the second quilt in this series, Silver Lining with Alternate Block 2. It’s a simple variation on the shoo fly block.

I’m not going to be changing the colors used in these quilts because I wanted to see what the differences are without also changing the fabrics. I think we have all seen a quilt pattern made in very different fabrics and it’s sometimes hard to believe it’s the same quilt.

Block size 12″ finished

If you like this idea please follow this page and share and like this post.

If anyone is interested I hope to have block directions available in 2 to 3 weeks for all 31 blocks as a PDF download from my website.

Stay safe, stay home, and quilt!

Pat

Disappearing Broken Dishes aka Disappearing Hourglass

This blog contains the information on making the Disappearing Broken Dishes block from 5″ squares. The block will finish 7″ and will not have bias edges!

Disappearing Broken Dishes

I know many refer to this block as the Disappearing Hourglass but I already have several sample disappearing blocks made from what I usually call an Hourglass Block. This is the block that I normally picture when I think of an Hourglass Block .

Hourglass Unit

And below is the block I’m starting with and I normally think of this block as the Broken Dishes block so that’s why I’m calling this the Disappearing Broken Dishes block.

Broken Dishes

All you need to make this block is two 5″ squares of a dark or medium fabric and two 5″ squares of background fabric.  Sew these squares into half-square-triangles and square up to 4 1/2″.  If you need detailed instructions on how to do that you can find that information here on a previous blog post of mine.

four hst units

Sew the four half-square-triangles into the block as show below. This block should measure 8 1/2″ at this point.

Broken Dishes

To make the disappearing block we need to cut this block into three equal sections in both directions.  Now if you happen to have a calculator handy you will see that 8 1/2″ divided by 3 is not a nice easy measurement to work with, it’s 2.83333, what kind of a measurement is that! It’s not 2 7/8″ (2.875) and it’s not  even 2 13/16 (2.8125).  So in my world I say it’s a couple of threads less than 2 7/8″.  Don’t panic yet, the good news is that you only need to measure a piece of paper to that size once and use that as your template.

Ruler with paper template

I have Electric Quilt so I just drew a 7″ finished sized block, divided it into three equal parts and had Electric Quilt print a template.

Cut the block into nine equal pieces.

Block cut into 9 pieces

Arrange the pieces as shown below and sew together.

pieces arranged

Disappearing Broken Dishes

Enjoy!

Pat

Pat Speth author of:  Nickel Quilts,   More Nickel Quilts,  Amazing Nickel Quilts,  Nickel Quilts & Borders, and The Big Book of Nickel Quilts

This information is copyright protected
© 2015 Pat Speth
All rights reserved.
This pattern/design is for your personal, non-commercial use only.
You are not allowed to mass produce this information.

To schedule a Nickel Quilt lecture or workshop contact Pat at the email below.

Email: pat@patspeth.com
www.patspeth.com

Combination Units – Finished Size 4″

Combination Unit

Combination Unit

For the next Deli Geese Project Blocks I am making pinwheel centers using Combination Units. To make the Combination Units I start with Half Square Triangles, and to make Combination Units that will finish 4″ I use Half Square Triangles that measure 5″. Details on how to make the Half Square Triangles are found here.

Take the Half Square Triangle that measures 5″ square and cut in half on the diagonal.  For now use just the unit on the right.  The unit on the left will also be made into Combination Units but we need to pay attention to the fact that we have just created right sided and left sided units and to keep them separated.

HST cut in half

 

For the larger triangle in the Combination Unit select another 5″ square and cut it in half on the diagonal.

5 inch square cut on the diagonal

Sew the two pieces together, set the seam, and press towards the larger triangle.  Now we trim this unit to 4 1/2″.

Combination Unit ready to trim

Align the 45º diagonal line of the ruler with the long seam line in the unit. Position the ruler so that the fabric extends past the ruler on two adjacent edges, with the two remaining edges extending past the 4 1/2″ lines of the ruler and with short seam line running through the 4 1/2″ mark on the edge of the ruler (see arrow in picture below). Trim away the fabric extending past the ruler.

detail of trimming with arrow

Reposition the unit so that the two trimmed edges now line up with the 4 1/2″ lines on the ruler and the 45º diagonal line of the ruler is aligned with the long seam line. Trim the remaining two edges. You should have a perfect, 4 1/2″ square combination unit.

Combination Unit

Four of these right sided units will make a pinwheel block.

Enjoy!
Pat

Pat Speth author of:  Nickel Quilts,   More Nickel Quilts,  Amazing Nickel Quilts,  Nickel Quilts & Borders, and The Big Book of Nickel Quilts

This information is copyright protected
© 2014 Pat Speth
All rights reserved.
This pattern/design is for your personal, non-commercial use only.
You are not allowed to mass produce this information.

To schedule a Nickel Quilt lecture or workshop contact Pat at the email below.

Email: pat@patspeth.com
www.patspeth.com

Half Square Triangles – Two More Sizes From a Five Inch Square

For some upcoming Deli Geese Project Blocks I want to make pinwheel centers using Combination Units.  Normally my Combination Units have a finished size of  3 3/4″ when starting with 5″ squares. I begin by using Half Square Triangle units that measure 4 1/2″ unfinished and sew them to more 5″ squares, details can be found in, Pinwheel Promenade, a free pattern on my website. This method would not work for the Deli Geese blocks in which I need an 8″ finished size center.

Combination Unit Combination Unit Actually I think the traditional name for these units is: Half Square Quarter Square Triangle Units, but I decided a long time ago that was way to much trouble for me to say, so I just called them Combination Units because I consider them a combination of the Half Square Triangle Unit and the Quarter Square Triangle Unit.

Now, how to make them with a finished size of 4″ when one starts with a 5″ square of fabric. I know I could start with a larger square of fabric but my goal is to make as many things as possible out of just a 5″ square.

So with a 5″ square of background fabric, draw a diagonal line from corner to corner, then measure over 1/2″ inch and draw a second line.

Background two lines drawn B

Stitch along the drawn lines, just to the inside of them and not right on them. This is to compensate for the thickness of the thread in the seam allowance and the pressing of the fabric over the seam.

Stitching on inside of drawn lines b

Cut between the stitching lines. Set the seams and press to the darker fabric.

Cut unit

Now we have two Half Square Triangle Units. The one on the left measures 5″ unfinished and the one on the right measures 4 1/4″ unfinished.

Two HST units

For my combination units in the Deli Geese Blocks I will use the 5″ Half Square Triangle unit.  The smaller Half Square Triangle unit could be used in a pieced border for the quilt, in an alternate block in the current quilt, or the start of a second quilt.

More details for making the Combination unit will follow in another blog post.

Enjoy!
Pat

Pat Speth author of:  Nickel Quilts,   More Nickel Quilts,  Amazing Nickel Quilts,  Nickel Quilts & Borders, and The Big Book of Nickel Quilts

This information is copyright protected
© 2014 Pat Speth
All rights reserved.
This pattern/design is for your personal, non-commercial use only.
You are not allowed to mass produce this information.

To schedule a Nickel Quilt lecture or workshop contact Pat at the email below.

Email: pat@patspeth.com
www.patspeth.com

Turnabout Pieced Border Blocks

I’ve made the big decision on which border blocks to use on the Turnabout quilt and the winner is:

four border blocks

To make these border blocks I started with Half-Square-Triangles that are squared up to 4 1/2″ and before sub-cutting I arranged them in this orientation.

two half square triangles

Measure over 2 1/4″ and cut each unit in half.

Units cut in half

Arrange the units as shown below and sew together.

Arranged into blocks

I pressed the seam in these units open to reduce the bulk.

Pressing

My border blocks are all done!

All the border blocks done

Turnabout blocks are done, border blocks are done, and now it’s time to get this quilt assembled!

Pat

Turnabout

It’s been gloomy, snowing, and raining for the past several days and I keep putting off cleaning off my longarm machine which lives in my basement. That also means I am putting off getting any quilt tops quilted. I only want to be in my attic studio piecing blocks. So guess what? I’m starting a new quilt, and it’s going to be several new quilts!  Years ago I traded 5″ squares and fat quarters (which you can cut into twelve 5″ squares) like crazy and have tubs full of them.  Many of these fabrics are well over 20 years old and need to be put into quilts, they have aged long enough!

I have the need to make quilts right now for the pure pleasure of it and not think about putting the quilt in a book or pattern which would mean; how would it photograph, is this the best fabric choice for this quilt, and writing up the pattern for publication. I just need to piece!

I’m also celebrating on July 1st my 10 year anniversary of being able to teach quilting as my full time profession and I have been thinking what can I do to celebrate this milestone? So I am going to make and give to charity 10 quilts! I will be sharing the quilts and construction techniques on this blog so others can also share in on the fun of making these quilts.  What I want to focus on is how to make good looking quilts out of older stash fabrics and make them relatively simple.

This is my first project, I’m calling it Turnabout.  It’s made from half-square-triangle units, which are my favorite units to make.

Two blocks

So that you can join along with me in making this block here is the information to get you started. To make the blocks like I did you will need 4 dark 5″ squares that are from the same fabric and 4 light 5″ squares that are the same. Make half-square-triangles units and square them up to 4 1/2″, you will have 8 half-square-triangles that are all the same.

You then measure over 2 1/4″ and cut the unit in half.  Be sure to position all the units in the orientation as shown below.

HST cut in half

Next measure over 4″ and trim 1/2″ off of the solid edge of the unit.

Units with ends trimmed off

Arrange the light units and the dark units as shown.

light units dark units

Sew the seams.

units sewn together

Arrange the units into dark blocks and light blocks.

Dark units for block

Units for the light block

The finished blocks! They will finish 7″.

Finished dark block

Finished light block

Have fun with this block idea and in my next blog I’ll give some additional pointers on working with this block.

Pat

Baby Quilts Part 2

I finished all the half square triangles for the three Baby Quilts I started earlier this month.  I decided to make each quilt a little different by using different blocks for each quilt.  One quilt will have the half square triangle units arranged into pinwheel blocks.

Pinwheel

The second quilt will have the units arranged into a broken dishes block.

Broken dishes

The third will use this simple block idea. This block has no name right now, it has elements of the traditional Indian Hatchet, Cedar Tree, and Simple Triangle blocks combined.

Simple Triangles

At this point I lay out all the half square triangles and start arranging sets of them into blocks, stacking each set on either paper plates or cardboard dividers.  This way I can distribute the plaids between all the quilts and I won’t end up with just blue plaids or small brown plaids for the last quilt.  I work this way even when I am making just one quilt to distribute the fabrics throughout the quilt.

Blocks for 3 quilts copy

My next step is to get these blocks sewn together!

Pat

Southwest Florida Quilters Guild and the Shaded Four Patch Workshop

I taught two different workshops for the Southwest Florida Quilters Guild.  The first workshop was Shaded Four Patch class with four different quilts that could be made.

These are student blocks for the Rocky Road to Dublin quilt from the More Nickel Quilt book.

A couple of blocks for the Shaded Four Patch quilt found in the first Nickel Quilt book.

And some blocks for the Steamboat Springs quilt from the Nickel Quilts & Borders book.

So many units are taught in this workshop: the shaded four patch unit, large and small half square triangle units, four patch units, and flying geese.  The shaded four patch unit by itself also offers many design possibilities.

Pat

Half Square Triangles Finished Size 2″

To make half square triangles that will finish 2″ from 5″ squares this is what you need:

Two 5″ squares – one dark and one light.

1. On the wrong side of a light 5″ square mark the 2 1/2″ point on each side of the square.

2. Draw lines to connect the marks.

3. Place the light square right-sides together with a dark 5″ square. Stitch along side the drawn line but not right on it – about one thread width to the outside of the drawn diagonal lines (towards the corners).  This is to allow for the thickness of the thread in the seam allowance and the pressing of the fabric over the seam.

4. Cut the unit in half lengthwise and crosswise at the 2 1/2″ marks. Each resulting unit will measure 2 1/2″ square.

5. Test the alignment of the  triangle edges with the square.  If desired, you may stitch a second  seam 1/2″ away from the first seam to sew your waste triangles together before cutting them away.

6. Done!  Four half square triangle units that should measure 2 1/2″ unfinished and will finish at 2″.

And of course you are able to make these from 2 1/2″ strips using a ruler to cut the triangles- but the challenge I give myself is, “If I only have 5″ squares what can I do with them?”

Stay tuned for an upcoming blog post with a quilt block that will use these little guys!

Pat